Why do Filipinas marry foreigners

Because of the internet and social media, it is now easier for men and women to meet someone from the other side of the world. It’s not so hard to imagine why marriages between different races are now prevalent.

Every year, foreigners sponsor thousands of Filipino women to come to countries like the U.S., U.K., Australia, Germany, Canada, and New Zealand as their wives or fiancees. However, some argue that Filipino women marry foreigners not for love but primarily for financial stability. Why do Filipino women want to marry foreigners?

Marrying for money is normal for some Asian countries, especially in the Philippines. The Philippines, once a third world country, is currently a developing country. However, the opportunity for a better life is still limited. The lack of access to health care and education intensifies the need to get out of poverty as fast as possible. 

Another thing to consider is that Filipino women are deeply attached to their families. Marrying a wealthy foreigner for money is not frowned upon, so long as she will help in improving the lives of her parents and siblings. 

Filipinos also have this notion that people earning dollars are financially well-off. It is also the reason why most Filipinos prefer to work abroad. Filipino women, especially those with poor educational backgrounds, see foreigners as their ticket out of poverty.

Most people still find the practice wrong, but can we blame the Filipino women for wanting a better life? Even though the Filipina woman is benefitting by being financially stable, the foreign man also gains companionship and care. 


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Some Filipino women marry white foreign men for the opportunity provided by the origin country of the foreigner. As mentioned earlier, the Philippines is still a developing country. It doesn’t offer the same benefits for its citizens as western countries do. The opportunity of studying or working abroad is a tremendous privilege for Filipinos. 

Quality education, although a right, is not readily available to all Filipinos. Most public schools that are funded by the government are overcrowded and have inadequate facilities. Private schools that offer better facilities and quality teaching are expensive. The parents usually push their eldest to finish his studies first. Once the eldest child starts working, he now has to support his younger siblings financially as they continue with their studies.

A typical Filipino working in Manila earns about USD10 a day. Those living in the provinces earn way lower. Working abroad has always been a dream for most Filipinos struggling to survive from what little they make.  It is another opportunity to send money to their family back home, giving them a more comfortable life to live.

Another factor to consider is the beauty standards of the Philippines. Filipinos adore fair and white skin. Most Filipino women use bleaching products and whitening supplements to achieve a whiter skin color. Having a tall nose is another beauty standard that is common to Filipinos. Parents would even pinch their child’s nose bridge. They believe that this will help in making the child’s nose grow taller. 

As you’ve noticed, the standard of beauty of Filipinos is very un-Filipino like. Some believe that it’s related to the country’s colonial mentality. Decades ago, Filipinos with Spanish or American heritage used to have a higher social status. This idea is still part of the Filipino culture today. Plenty of Filipino celebrities have caucasian features instead of Filipino traits. 

Although Filipino women are attracted to foreigners, most of them do not marry young and charming guys. Most foreigners that marry Filipino women are often old and not-so-attractive. However, it is also possible that Filipino women want the caucasian look for their future children instead. If you’ve been to the Philippines, you will notice that most Filipinos are mixed-race – American, Australian, Chinese, Korean, etc.

If most Filipino women marry for these reasons, and not for love, then why do foreigners still want to marry them? It’s because Filipino women are different from Western women. Aside from physical differences, Filipino women have a different culture and personality the most foreigners love.

Filipinos are family-oriented. They care for their families and respect their elders. Marrying a Filipino woman means you’ll be part of a loving and caring family. Traditional family values are still deeply rooted in the Flipino culture. Because of this, respect and companionship will play a significant role in Filipino women’s relationships. It’s also an advantage if the foreign man is planning to start a family because Filipino women are dedicated and will do everything for their families.  

Filipino women also want a harmonious and fulfilling relationship. She will take care of her husband and will satisfy his needs as much as she can. Filipino women are also loyal and respectful. It’s part of their upbringing and culture. 

Despite the bad image associated with Filipino women, let us keep in mind that the marriage won’t push through without the consent of the foreign man. Most foreign men looking for a Filipino wife are middle-aged or older. Some are divorced and came from angry and bitter relationships. It’s also the reason why most people assume that the Filipino woman married the man for money. If it’s not because of the man’s attractiveness, then what else? 

Yes, most Filipina women marry for money. However, they also do it in the hopes of learning to love the man eventually. This belief is common for arranged marriages, but it’s also applicable in this situation. Despite the age gap and other people’s judgment, Filipino women usually believe that they will learn to love their husbands genuinely in time.

Some may say that Filipino women see marriage as nothing but a simple business transaction. Perhaps in some cases, that is true. Still, some couples do it for love. Genuine relationships rooted from love and friendship exists. It can be hard to believe because of the stereotypes that come with this kind of relationship. However, they do exist. 

It can be hard to stop judging this type of relationships, especially when some Filipino women do marry for money. Nevertheless, let us remember that we all have different preferences in life. As long as the relationship is harmonious, then let us respect their decision.

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